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Academy for Justice

Our Vision


A criminal justice system where actual practices correspond with best practices, as determined by fact-based, non-partisan academic research.

Our Mission


Bridging the gap between academia and on-the-ground criminal justice reform by making scholarly research and ideas accessible to policymakers, stakeholders, journalists, and the public.

Why the Academy for Justice?

A growing bipartisan consensus at the local, state, and federal levels holds that the American criminal justice system needs to be reimagined. Incarceration rates have expanded at an exponential rate, without corresponding public safety outcomes. Indeed, in the effort to keep our communities safe, our criminal justice policies and practices often infringe upon human dignity, diminish social trust, and waste government resources. We criminalize blameless conduct. We over-punish those who commit low-level, nonviolent crimes. We struggle to rehabilitate or reintegrate prisoners into their communities. We ignore the rights and voices of crime victims. And we police in a manner that all too often weakens the fundamental bond between community and law-enforcement.

The Academy for Justice brings a scholarly light to bear on these problems with the hope of illuminating a path toward a more equitable, humane, and fiscally responsible criminal justice system. The Academy envisions a criminal justice system where actual practices correspond with best practices, and policy decisions are based on data and evidence, rather than raw politics or mere rhetoric. We are committed to the belief that criminal justice reform is not–and should not be–a partisan issue and that a well-functioning criminal justice system benefits victims, defendants, and society at large. Our independent, research-driven approach to criminal justice reform leads us to support a number of changes to the existing system, including: implementing policing strategies that bolster both public safety and community relations; limiting criminal liability to culpable actors; aligning punishment with the nature and seriousness of an offense; affording victims a meaningful role in the justice process; and ensuring that prisoners return to their communities with meaningful opportunities and the knowledge and skills necessary to realize them.

Featured project

Police Cruiser

Are Police the Key to Public Safety? The Case of the Unhoused

On Friday, November 12, 2021, Professor Barry Friedman, one of the country’s leading authorities on policing, will give the first-ever Academy for Justice Distinguished Lecture. Professor Friedman’s lecture examines the policing homelessness as a vehicle for considering whether a broader conception of public safety may require us to rethink the role of police and policing in resolving social problems. Comments to Professor Friedman’s lecture will be provided by Professors Trevor Gardner, Ben McJunkin, Maria Ponomorenko, and former police chief and postdoctoral researcher, Brandon del Pozo. A written version of the lecture will subsequently be published in the American Criminal Law Review. Read more

What does the Academy for Justice do?

The Academy for Justice bridges the gap between academia and on-the-ground criminal justice reform efforts by acting as a conduit between scholarly research and ideas and criminal justice policymakers, stakeholders, journalists, and the public. Our primary objectives include:

  • Identifying the major challenges confronting our criminal justice system;
  • Developing and promoting fact-based, non-partisan scholarship that identifies potential reforms;
  • Facilitating the sharing of information between academics and those responsible for making and implementing criminal justice policy.

Our History

Erik Luna
Erik Luna
Erik Luna

 

The Academy for Justice was founded by Faculty Director Erik Luna in October 2016 as a national academic alliance to address critical issues of criminal justice in the United States. That year, Erik convened the nation’s leading scholars in criminal law and other fields to produce a first-of-its-kind four-volume report on criminal justice reform. Published in October 2017, and written by a veritable “who’s who” list of academics, Reforming Criminal Justice offers concise analyses and clear bi-partisan policy recommendations on every major issue of criminal justice policy. The final product is publicly available free of charge here, and has provided policymakers, scholars, staffers, and students around the country with an authoritative and insightful starting point for learning more about—and how to directly participate in—criminal justice reform at a local, state, and federal level. (Additional information about Reforming Criminal Justice is provided in the report’s preface here.)

In July 2018, the Sandra Day O’Connor College of Law received a generous grant to help establish the Academy for Justice as an ongoing endeavor at the Sandra Day O’Connor College of Law at Arizona State University, designed to serve as a platform for further projects that critically examine the criminal justice system and help inform educational, cultural, and policy efforts. Once established, the Academy for Justice welcomed three new criminal law specialists – Valena Beety, Ben McJunkin, and Michael Serota – and began to plan and put on programing. Some of the first successful programming included hosting a “Reentry Summit” that focused on barriers to reentry that inmates face in Arizona and nationally. Other successful events were made possible by partnerships with the Academy for Justice, including “Transforming the Police,” a one-day conference on key reforms to American policing, co-sponsored by Arizona State University’s School of Criminology & Criminal Justice and the Center for Violence Prevention and Community Safety; and “The Controlled Substances Act at 50 Years” (CSA@50), a three-day conference in partnership with the Drug Enforcement & Policy Center at The Ohio State University Moritz College of Law, which marked a half-century of drug policy under the federal government’s comprehensive statutory scheme.

Despite the challenges 2020 brought worldwide, the Academy for Justice has continued its efforts to improve the criminal justice system.

With the spread of COVID-19 shutting down in person operations, the Academy for Justice quickly adjusted, rethinking and retooling how to further our mission while contending with the “new normal.” The devastating effects of COVID-19 on prison populations became a focal point of community education for the Academy for Justice, which created several podcasts and webinars on the subject. Likewise, the Academy for Justice sought to respond to the unrest across the country that followed the death of George Floyd in Minnesota. Among other things, the Academy hosted a virtual webinar, “Police Violence in America: Obvious Problem, Obvious Solution,” with Roy L. Austin, Jr., a former civil rights prosecutor and Deputy Assistant to President Obama for the Office of Urban Affairs, Justice & Opportunity. The Academy for Justice also continued its work on longstanding reform topics, such as changes to culpability standards in criminal law, including a groundbreaking event, “Guilty Minds: A Virtual Conference on Mens Rea and Criminal Justice Reform,” which used technological innovations to bring together some of the nation’s leading criminal law professors and practitioners for an extended two-day conversation about mens rea policy and its role within the broader criminal justice reform movement through video presentations and webinar discussions. As the Academy for Justice continues to grow, adapt and move forward, one main goal remains the same – the vision for a criminal justice system where actual practices correspond with best practices, as determined by fact-based, non-partisan academic research.

 

Experts and Affiliates

         
Shima Baradaran Baughman

Shima Baradaran Baughman

Professor of Law and Associate Dean of punishableulty Research

University of Utah
Valena Beety

Valena Beety

Professor of Law and Deputy Director - Academy for Justice

Arizona State University
Douglas A. Berman

Douglas A. Berman

Robert J. Watkins/Procter & Gamble Professor of Law and Executive Director of the Drug Enforcement and Policy Center

The Ohio State University
Bennett Capers

Bennett Capers

Professor of Law

Fordham University
Paul G. Cassell

Paul G. Cassell

Ronald N. Boyce Presidential Professor of Criminal Law and University Distinguished Professor of Law

University of Utah
Gabriel J. Chin

Gabriel J. Chin

Edward L. Barrett Chair in Law and Martin Luther King, Jr. Professor of Law

University of California, Davis
Beth A. Colgan

Beth A. Colgan

Professor of Law

University of California, Los Angeles
Frank Rudy Cooper

Frank Rudy Cooper

William S. Boyd Professor of Law and Director of the Program on Race, Gender, and Policing

University of Nevada, Las Vegas
Angela J. Davis

Angela J. Davis

Distinguished Professor of Law

American University
Henry F. Fradella

Henry F. Fradella

Professor and Associate Director, School of Criminology and Criminal Justice

Arizona State University
Barry Friedman

Barry Friedman

Jacob D. Fuchsberg Professor of Law, Affiliated Professor of Politics, and Director of the Policing Project

New York University
Brandon L. Garrett

Brandon L. Garrett

L. Neil Williams, Jr. Professor of Law and Faculty Director of the Center for Science and Justice

Duke University
Aya Gruber

Aya Gruber

Professor of Law

University of Colorado
Rachel A. Harmon

Rachel A. Harmon

F.D.G. Ribble Professor of Law

University of Virginia
Kristin Henning

Kristin Henning

Agnes N. Williams Research Professor of Law and Director of the Juvenile Justice Clinic and Initiative

Georgetown University
Elizabeth E. Joh

Elizabeth E. Joh

Martin Luther King Jr. Professor of Law

University of California, Davis
Nancy J. King

Nancy J. King

Lee S. & Charles A. Speir Professor of Law

Vanderbilt University
Erik Luna

Erik Luna

Amelia D. Lewis Professor of Constitutional and Criminal Law and Founder and Director - Academy for Justice

Arizona State University
Ben McJunkin

Ben McJunkin

Associate Professor of Law and Associate Deputy Director - Academy for Justice

Arizona State University
Pamela R. Metzger

Pamela R. Metzger

Professor of Law and Director of the Deason Criminal Justice Reform Center

Southern Methodist University
John Monahan

John Monahan

John S. Shannon Distinguished Professor of Law, Joel B. Piassick Research Professor of Law, Professor of Psychology, and Professor of Psychiatry and Neurobehavioral Sciences

University of Virginia
Alexandra Natapoff

Alexandra Natapoff

Lee S. Kreindler Professor of Law

Harvard Law School
Julie Rose O’Sullivan

Julie Rose O’Sullivan

Professor of Law

Georgetown University Law Center
Eve Brensike Primus

Eve Brensike Primus

Professor of Law

University of Michigan
L. Song Richardson

L. Song Richardson

Dean and Chancellor’s Professor of Law

University of California, Irvine
Margo Schlanger

Margo Schlanger

Wade H. and Dores M. McCree Collegiate Professor of Law

University of Michigan
Michael Serota

Michael Serota

Visiting Assistant Professor and Associate Deputy Director - Academy for Justice

Arizona State University
Christopher Slobogin

Christopher Slobogin

Milton Underwood Professor of Law, Affiliate Professor of Psychiatry, and Director of the Criminal Justice Program

Vanderbilt University
Stephen F. Smith

Stephen F. Smith

Professor of Law

University of Notre Dame
Jenia I. Turner

Jenia I. Turner

Amy Abboud Ware Centennial Professor in Criminal Law

Southern Methodist University
Robert Weisberg

Robert Weisberg

Edwin E. Huddleson, Jr. Professor of Law and Faculty Director of the Stanford Criminal Justice Center

Stanford University
Ronald F. Wright

Ronald F. Wright

Needham Y. Gulley Professor of Criminal Law

Wake Forest University

Need help? Contact Us

Jennifer Jost

Jennifer Jost

Communications Manager Academy for Justice Sandra Day O'Connor College of Law

Arizona State University

Jennifer.Leigh.Willis@asu.edu

Ashley Oddo

Ashley Oddo

Director, College of Law, Academy For Justice

Arizona State University

Ashley.Oddo@asu.edu