Indian Legal Program

Student opportunities

ILP Blanketed Students in the BCLS canyon

This certificate is awarded to students who finish 21 hours of relevant curriculum, write a substantial paper, and complete practical work in the Indian Legal Clinic.

This program provides an innovative and challenging curriculum for students; hosts annual conferences for students, attorneys, tribal leaders, tribal citizens, policy makers, entrepreneurs, developers, and financial advisors that focus on tribal economic development; creates a community outreach component. National conferences and lectures—top scholars and attorneys are invited to present cutting-edge legal issues in Indian country.

The Native Vote Election Protection Project allows students to share information about individual voting rights.

The Tribal Court Trial Skills Program is an intensive week of training for tribal court advocates.

The Pipeline to Law Initiative invites students and attorneys to assist in community outreach, mentorship, and pre-law advising to help improve access to justice in tribal communities - Learn more about Pipeline to Law Initiative.

The Native American Law Students Association (NALSA) at ASU Law is a large and active group of Native and non-Native law students. NALSA is committed to promoting the understanding of Native American cultures and legal issues affecting indigenous people. NALSA organizes community service activities, social activities, and mentorships. The student mentorships provide incoming students with academic support, advice and friendship.

The ASU Chapter of NALSA is an active member of the National NALSA organization, and meets annually in Albuquerque during the Federal Indian Bar Conference. ASU NALSA members regularly hold national NALSA offices and have won several national awards for its activities and community efforts.

NALSA hosts an annual golf tournament, participates in pro bono activities, mentors incoming students, and is the co-sponsor of the ILP/NALSA graduation. Between the ASU chapter of NALSA and the ILP, students have an instant network to support them academically, professionally and socially.

ILP students can attend national conferences and lectures that invite top scholars, tribal leaders and attorneys to present on cutting-edge legal issues.

Students are given the opportunity to see the law in action with two Traveling Classes and learn from experts in the field.

Federal Advocacy for the Tribal Client students attend class in Washington D.C. during Fall Break at the ASU DC Center with Former Assistant Secretary for Indian Affairs Carl Artman and visiting lecturers from the DC area providing instruction. This class introduces students to the practical application of the government to government relationship between tribes and the federal government, including the development of federal Indian policy. While in DC the students visit different offices and network with professionals working in the field.

Contemporary Issues in Tribal Economic Development students attend class in Winnebago, Nebraska during Spring Break at the corporate headquarters of Ho-Chunk, Inc. with Lance Morgan, CEO of Ho-Chunk Inc., instructing the class. Ho-Chunk, Inc. is an award-winning economic development corporation owned by the Winnebago Tribe of Nebraska. Established in 1994 in Winnebago, Nebraska with one employee, Ho-Chunk, Inc. has grown to over 1,000 employees with operations in 10 states and 4 foreign countries. Topics covered include tobacco and gas operations and tax compacts, tribal corporate structures, government contracting, a new tribal farming initiative, as well as numerous other subjects.

Indian Legal Clinic

Indian Legal Clinic students with Judge Antone

The Indian Legal Clinic (ILC) provides law students with an opportunity to participate in real cases dealing with native peoples and Indian issues. ILC serves both Indian country and the nation's urban Indian populations by providing high-quality legal services, with attention to the special legal and cultural needs of native peoples. The ILC works with tribal courts handling criminal prosecutions and defense actions, undertakes tribal legal development projects, such as drafting tribal code provisions and court rules for Indian tribes, represents individuals in civil actions, and works on federal policy issues affecting native people, such as federal recognition.

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ILP Collage

Native American Law Students Association (NALSA)

Native American Law Students Association (NALSA) is a large and active group of Native and non-Native law students. NALSA is committed to promoting the understanding of Native American cultures and legal issues affecting indigenous people. NALSA organizes community service activities, social activities, and mentorships. The student mentorships provide incoming students with academic support, advice, and friendship. The chapter is an active member of the National NALSA organization, competes in the Annual National NALSA moot court competition, and co-sponsors the ILP/NALSA graduation celebration.